Nordic Geological Winter Meeting

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Start Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018
End Date: 
Friday, January 12, 2018

Web: http://2dgf.dk/foreningen/33rd-nordic-geological-winter-meeting/

Includes the following sessions:

1.1. Hotspots and intraplate magmas: mantle sources, magmatic processes and metasomatism

Convenors: Nina Soager (ns@ign.ku.dk), Valentin Troll (valentin.troll@geo.uu.se), Abi Barker (abigail.barker@geo.uu.se)

This session invites contributions that explore the mantle geochemistry, petrology and dynamics of intraplate volcanism both in oceanic and continental settings. We welcome studies of the temporal and spatial evolution of mantle plumes in terms of composition, temperature, sources, magma chamber processes and surface expressions. We also encourage contributions addressing mantle metasomatism, the interaction between asthenospheric melts and lithospheric mantle and the tectonic processes triggering intraplate magmatism. We invite research that explores the geochemistry of bulk lavas (including isotopes), melt inclusions, single phases (including mineral-mineral and mineral-melt equilibria) or xenoliths from intraplate volcanic settings such as ocean islands, intracontinental basaltic fields and highly alkaline rocks.

1.3. Understanding large igneous provinces and associated rapid environmental changes: from the North Atlantic Igneous Province and beyond

Convenors: Sverre Planke (planke@vbpr.no), Christian Tegner (christian.tegner@geo.au.dk), Dougal Jerram (dougal@dougalearth.com)

Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are known to correlate in time with periods of mass extinctions and global warming in Earth history. This session aims at presenting new observations and results on; the formation of lips, on mass extinction intervals, and on the possible causal relationships between lips and associated environmental changes. This may include stratigraphic and proxy records of mass extinction, documentation of the petrology, chronology and geophysics of lips, petrogenetic processes, links to modern plume related volcanism, and modelling. Focus will be on the North Atlantic lip and how it may have triggered the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). However, contributions on other lips and environmental crises, such as the end-Permian, the end-Triassic, and the end Cretaceous extinctions, are also welcome.

City: 
Copenhagen, Denmark